Sleek Geeks Live – 50 Shades of Geek

It’s a National Science Week launch like no other as Dr Karl Kruszelnicki and Adam Spencer – Australia’s favourite Sleek Geeks – put the band back together in a spectacular stage show celebrating science, called ’50 Shades of Geek’.

This massive night of science and comedy will have you laughing so much you won’t realise how much you’ve learnt.

The Sleek Geeks will entertain the crowd with funny facts, startling science and amusing anecdotes in their high energy science show, presented by the University of Sydney and the City of Sydney to open National Science Week in NSW with a bang.

Date: Monday 13 August 2012

Time: 7:00pm – 8:30pm

Location: Centennial Hall, Sydney Town Hall

Cost: Free

Bookings: http://sleekgeeks.eventbrite.com.au/

Dr Karl’s Brain Food

Presented by Dr Karl Kruszelnicki
Julius Sumner Miller Fellow, School of Physics, the University of Sydney

Australia’s favourite science ‘guy’, Dr Karl Kruszelnicki, will present his latest swag of super science stories. If you like your science dished up with a big serving of humour, then don’t miss this opportunity to see Dr Karl live at the University of Sydney. Get the lowdown from Dr Karl, and find out what his favourite Brain Food is!

At the end of the talk, you’ll have the opportunity to ask Dr Karl those burning science questions that you’ve been pondering for years.

Event details

Date: Wednesday 16 May 2012
Time: 5.45pm – 6.45pm
Venue: Eastern Avenue Auditorium, University of Sydney
Cost: Free

O Week, Dean’s Welcome and SciSoc BBQ

This week starts the festivities that are O Week, the best way to get back to/start University life.
Come by! Buy a Tshirt, your golden ticket to free lunch every even Wednesday. If you’re new, register for our first year camp! If you want to find out more about all the events we hold, want to be kept updated, or just want to chat cause we’re pretty nice guys, we’ll be opposite Eastern Avenue Auditorium this Wednesday to Friday!
The Dean is also giving a formal welcome to all you young science kids, catch it on Wednesday the 29th February, 11am–1pm at Eastern Ave Auditorium.
If you’re in need of food after that, SciSoc will be providing a free BBQ in the Carslaw Lawns.

This week starts the festivities that are O Week, the best way to get back to/start University life.
Come by! Buy a Tshirt, your golden ticket to free lunch every even Wednesday. If you’re new, register for our first year camp! If you want to find out more about all the events we hold, want to be kept updated, or just want to chat cause we’re pretty nice guys, we’ll be opposite Eastern Avenue Auditorium this Wednesday to Friday!
The Dean is also giving a formal welcome to all you young science kids, catch it on Wednesday the 29th February, 11am–1pm at Eastern Ave Auditorium.
If you’re in need of food after that, SciSoc will be providing a free BBQ in the Carslaw Lawns.

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Numbers: Their Human Aspects. Perspective from Indigenous Cultures

Presented by the Centre for Human Aspects of Science and Technology (CHAST)

Speaker: Dr Helen Verran, History and Philosophy of Science, University of Melbourne.

Many people spend a lot of time looking at numbers, or more to the point, looking through numbers at something else.

In this talk, Dr Helen Verran will take a look at numbers as such. How can we ‘see’ numbers? And why would we want to?

Dr Verran will tell of the experience of working with teachers in primary school classrooms in Nigeria. This made Dr Verran recognise that if we are going to understand how science might come to life as a significant cultural element in places like Nigeria, we need a way to see the cultural lives that things like numbers have.

Having done some preliminary thinking with the help of Nigerian primary school children, Dr Verran turned to her experiences of working with Yolngu Aboriginal Australians who own lands in northeast Arnhem Land.

Dr Verran will make a rather surprising analogy which she suggests can help us better understand the sorts of things numbers are.

Dr Helen Verran is a Reader in History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Melbourne. She has a PhD in metabolic biochemistry. For most of the 1980s she worked as a science lecturer in the Institute for Education at Obafemi Awolowo University in Nigeria. Her book Science and an African Logic (2001) was published out of this experience. Since she returned to Australia she has worked with Yolngu Aboriginal communities in northeast Arnhem Land. An early product of this work was the small book Singing the Land, Signing the Land now available online. The website: http://singing.indigenousknowledge.org/ provides background for her CHAST Lecture.

Free admission, no bookings. All welcome. More info here!

When 8 November 2011, 5:30pm – 6:30pm
Where Eastern Avenue Auditorium, University of Sydney
Cost FREE
RSVP None!! Just turn up!

Sydney Science Forum: Special Molecular Gastronomy Event

THE SYDNEY SCIENCE FORUM PRESENTS

An explosive night of Molecular Gastronomy
Featuring Professor Hervé This, Chef Martin Benn and Adam Spencer
Tuesday 25 October 2011

Prepare your senses for a culinary adventure of foams, froths and frozen treats as the father of molecular gastronomy, Professor Hervé This demonstrates the science behind famous molecular gastronomy techniques. Acclaimed Sydney chef Martin Benn of Sepia restaurant will showcase his expertise in blurring the boundaries of conventional cooking in order to create extraordinary new textures and surprising taste sensations.

A cocktail reception will follow the lecture where guests will have the opportunity to sample a variety of unique molecular gastronomy concoctions.

An entertaining evening that is guaranteed to change the way you cook at home!

Featuring special guest compére Adam Spencer.

When 25 October 2011, 6:00pm – 8:00pm
Where The Great Hall, University of Sydney
Cost FREE
RSVP The Sydney Science Forum

Phone: 02 9351 3021

Email: science.forum@sydney.edu.au

CHAST – 2011 Templeton Lecture: The Emotional Brain

Presented by the Centre for Human Aspects of Science and Technology (CHAST)

Speaker: Professor Joseph LeDoux, Center for Neural Science, New York University.

The study of emotion has been hampered by a fixation on feelings. Feelings are important, but not all important. Problems arise when we use feelings, and their semantic labels, as guides to studying brain function in other animals.

Rather than imposing concepts based on human introspective experience to the brains of other creatures, we should attempt to understand how the human brain is similar to the brains of other animals. This then becomes a foundation for understanding differences between humans and other animals.

By reorienting the comparative study of emotions around survival circuit functions, we have the opportunity to understand similarities and differences in emotional functions between humans and other animals.

When 17 October 2011, 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Where Eastern Avenue Auditorium, University of Sydney
Cost FREE
RSVP None!! Just turn up!

CHAST Lecture – The Singularity: A Philosophical Analysis

What happens when machines become more intelligent than humans? Some have proposed that a ‘singularity’ will ensue: machines will design more intelligent machines in turn, and there will be a rapid spiral to superintelligence.

Professor David Chalmers will analyse the argument for an intelligence explosion, and will also analyse resulting practical and philosophical issues. How, if it all, can we control the impact of superintelligence in a simulated world on our world? Will systems in a post-singularity world be conscious? Can we be among them?

More info here.

When 5:30 p.m., 27th May
Where Old Geology Theatre, Edgeworth David Geology Building, University of Sydney
Cost FREE
RSVP val.morris@sydney.edu.au

Week 9 BBQ, with a twist!

Meet and greet your science buddies at this week’s SciSoc all-you-can-eat BBQ – for FREE if you are dressed in the smoochingly stylish 2011 SciSoc T-shirt!

Enjoy yummy sausage sizzles with refreshing garden salads and tasty cheese fillings. As always, vegetarian-friendly options are available and extra-friendly service is guaranteed!

Also this week, SciSoc has combined forces with the EU to host a forum on Science and Faith. Come hear a few different perspectives from some guys and girls from both societies, followed by question time at the end.

When 12:00pm-1:30pm, Wednesday, 02 May 2011
Where Front of Chemistry Building

BBQ Location Map

Cost Dressed in 2011 SciSoc T-shirt: FREE!
Otherwise: $2 Access/$5 Non-Access

Sydney Science Forum: Law of the Locust

Speaker:
Prof. Steve Simpson (NSW Scientist of the Year)

Locust plagues are one of the most infamous insect scourges, affecting the lives of 1 in 10 people on the planet. But they have also provided important new clues into the causes of human obesity, how we age, and the complex behaviour of crowds. Professor Steve Simpson takes us on a strange journey that begins in the midst of a locust swarm and ends with the human obesity epidemic. Along the way you will see what you can discover by tickling a locust’s leg with a paintbrush, how recreational drugs turn shy solitary locusts into swarming party animals, how robotic helicopters are being used to track swarms, the sinister role played by cannibalism in locust swarms, and how a powerful appetite for protein can explain not only locust mass marching but also human obesity and ageing.

When 5:45pm-6:45pm, Wednesday, 15 September 2010
Where Eastern Ave Auditorium
Cost FREE
RSVP Please click here

Structural Studies on Cholesterol Transport

Speaker:
Prof. Johann Deisenhofer (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center)

Cholesterol is essential for mammals; it is produced internally or taken up with the diet and transported in the blood stream in the form of lipoproteins, with low density lipoprotein (LDL) being most abundant. LDL is bound at cell surfaces by receptors and internalized. Inside cells, LDL particles are released from the receptors, degraded in lysosomes, and cholesterol is transported by specific binding proteins to its destinations. Prof. Deisenhofer will describe four studies on structural aspects of cholesterol transport:Electron microscopy of low density lipoprotein (LDL) with and without bound LDL receptor protein shows size, shape and internal structure of typical LDL particles. The crystal structure of the extracellular portion of human LDL receptor at pH 5.3 illustrates the domain organization of the receptor, and suggests possible mechanisms for LDL release at low pH. The recently discovered protein PCSK9 binds to the LDL receptor and appears to regulate the degradation of the receptors. A crystal structure of the complex of PCSK9 with a fragment of the LDL receptor defines the binding interface and could lead to the development of new cholesterol-lowering drugs. Mutations in the proteins NPC1 and NPC2 can cause Niemann-Pick disease by slowing down or preventing the transport of cholesterol out of lysosomes. The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of NPC1 with and without bound cholesterol sheds light on the intra-lysosomal cholesterol transport pathway.

When 1:00pm-2:00pm, Wednesday, 18 September 2010
Where Lecture Theatre 104, New Law School
Cost FREE

About the Speakers

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