JumpStart Your Science Career!

It’s never too early to be thinking about the next step in your career, so prepare yourself by doing your research, asking questions and attending some of the careers events on offer this year! You will also have the opportunity to hear from industry representatives and recent Science graduates who were in your shoes not too long ago!

Join us for a conference style careers information evening designed for Science students from all disciplines. Come and meet employers and industry professionals from a variety of backgrounds and industries to get the answers to all of your career related questions.

We have representatives from Morgan Stanley Australia, Bureau of Meteorology (BOM), Heart Research Institute (HRI), Stockland, Westmead Institute for Cancer Research and Taronga Zoo Conservation Society – just to name a few! You are also invited to network and mingle with presenters over complimentary drinks and canapés at the conclusion of the sessions.

It’s FREE to attend, so register now and come along for some careers advice to get ahead of the rest!

When 5:15pm-7:30pm, Thursday, 16 September 2010
Where Level 1, New Law School
Cost FREE
RSVP Please click here

About the Sessions

Careers in Finance and Investment Management

Attention maths and statistics students! You are invited to come along and talk to representatives from the banking and finance industry about the graduate positions on offer for science graduates.We also have Terry Miu (B Sci Adv Maths, 2009 graduate) coming to speak about her experience in a graduate position at Morgan Stanley, a global investment bank with an office in Sydney.

Careers in Sustainability

Do you have a passion for the environment and an interest in conserving it for future generations? Sustainability is a key global issue and as a result governments and large organisations are seeking to employ individials to develop and implement solutions to the complex problems facing an increasingly resource-constrained society.

Find out more about working in this sector and the skills required from Stockland’s Manager of Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability, Ms Christina Hughes. Ms Samantha Mostyn, Directorof the Institute for Sustainable Solutions, will also be discussing her extensive experience within the Sustainability sector where she sees future demand.

Psychology Outside of the Clinic

If you are working towards a psychology major but aren’t sure you want to be a clinical psychologist this session will provide you with information about your options within the corporate world. Psychology graduates are in demand in areas such as market and social research, organisational psychology and human resource management.

Representatives from the Australian Market and Social Research Society (AMSRS) will be presenting information about working in this exciting area as well as useful hints and tips on how to identify and present your related skills.

Careers in Science Communication

What do Dr Karl Kruszelnicki, Warrick Angus from Taronga Zoo Conservation Society and Paul Willis, TV Science reporter and producer have in common? They are all science communicators who help improve science literacy within the community. You will hear their perspectives and advice on science communication as a career at this session as well as some hints and tips on how to find jobs and work experience in this area.

A Career in Science Teaching

Want to impact the lives of hundreds of young Australians? Want to inspire our next generation of scientists? Teaching will allow you to do this everyday.

Hear from Trent Wallis, a Sydney Science graduate who is now working as a science teacher at Sydney Grammar School and also holds the position of Deputy Director of the Australian Science Innovations Chemistry Olympiad Program.

Rose Khalilizadeh from Teach for Australia, will discuss the opportunities available to science graduates through their teaching program that enables you to train to become a teacher and obtain full salary, benefits and qualifications at the same time.

Careers in Biomedical Research

Make your dream of finding the cure to a disease a reality- with a career in biomedical research. Untangling the mechanisms of how diseases occur, progress and treatment is an incredibly rewarding field with the potential to impact millions of lives around the world.

Dr Clare Hawkins from the Heart Research Institute (HRI) will provide useful information about the biomedical industry as well as hints and tips on how to find graduate positions.

Renee Simms, Research Assistant with the Leukaemia Cell Therapies Group at Westmead Institute for Cancer Research, will provide an insight into what it is like working within this exciting industry.

Where Can a Physics Degree Take Me?

If you are studying Physics and would like to know more about your options after graduation, then come along to this session to hear from inspiring leaders working in research and industry.

Matt Francis (B Sci/BA Hons, 2004 graduate) will talk about his career path and his current role at the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) in the Ionospheric Prediction Service branch, where he works on space weather monitoring and prediction systems.

Professor Marcela Bilek (Physical Scientist of the Year 2002) will share her experience of how she became a leading researcher in Applied and Plasma Physics as well as advice for those seeking a career in research.

Careers in the Resources Industry

To find out more about career opportunities in the resources industry, come along to this session and hear from science graduates who are now working in the areas of mining, geology and geoscience.

Speakers include Charmaine Thomas, a geoscientist at Woodside Petroleum who will soon be returning to Sydney to commence her PhD investigating basin prospectvity.

Peter Buckley will talk about his work experience in the WA gold industry, underground mine geology, exploration management in gold and base metals across Australia and iron ore exploration in NSW and QLD.

Sydney Science Forum: Law of the Locust

Speaker:
Prof. Steve Simpson (NSW Scientist of the Year)

Locust plagues are one of the most infamous insect scourges, affecting the lives of 1 in 10 people on the planet. But they have also provided important new clues into the causes of human obesity, how we age, and the complex behaviour of crowds. Professor Steve Simpson takes us on a strange journey that begins in the midst of a locust swarm and ends with the human obesity epidemic. Along the way you will see what you can discover by tickling a locust’s leg with a paintbrush, how recreational drugs turn shy solitary locusts into swarming party animals, how robotic helicopters are being used to track swarms, the sinister role played by cannibalism in locust swarms, and how a powerful appetite for protein can explain not only locust mass marching but also human obesity and ageing.

When 5:45pm-6:45pm, Wednesday, 15 September 2010
Where Eastern Ave Auditorium
Cost FREE
RSVP Please click here

Structural Studies on Cholesterol Transport

Speaker:
Prof. Johann Deisenhofer (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center)

Cholesterol is essential for mammals; it is produced internally or taken up with the diet and transported in the blood stream in the form of lipoproteins, with low density lipoprotein (LDL) being most abundant. LDL is bound at cell surfaces by receptors and internalized. Inside cells, LDL particles are released from the receptors, degraded in lysosomes, and cholesterol is transported by specific binding proteins to its destinations. Prof. Deisenhofer will describe four studies on structural aspects of cholesterol transport:Electron microscopy of low density lipoprotein (LDL) with and without bound LDL receptor protein shows size, shape and internal structure of typical LDL particles. The crystal structure of the extracellular portion of human LDL receptor at pH 5.3 illustrates the domain organization of the receptor, and suggests possible mechanisms for LDL release at low pH. The recently discovered protein PCSK9 binds to the LDL receptor and appears to regulate the degradation of the receptors. A crystal structure of the complex of PCSK9 with a fragment of the LDL receptor defines the binding interface and could lead to the development of new cholesterol-lowering drugs. Mutations in the proteins NPC1 and NPC2 can cause Niemann-Pick disease by slowing down or preventing the transport of cholesterol out of lysosomes. The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of NPC1 with and without bound cholesterol sheds light on the intra-lysosomal cholesterol transport pathway.

When 1:00pm-2:00pm, Wednesday, 18 September 2010
Where Lecture Theatre 104, New Law School
Cost FREE

About the Speakers

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Australian of the Year – Professor Patrick McGorry

When 7:00pm, Friday, 3 September 2010
Where Great Hall, University of Sydney
Cost FREE

The 2010 Lambie-Dew Oration will be delivered by the current Australian of the Year, leading international researcher, clinician, mental health reform advocate and Sydney Medical School alumnus, Professor Patrick McGorry AO.

This year’s oration will be held at its traditional venue of the Great Hall, on Friday the 3rd of September, commencing at 7.00 pm. Refreshments will be provided from 6.00 pm. Admission is free, and we welcome all students and the general public to be part of the audience at this prized event in the Sydney University Medical Society’s calendar.

Professor McGorry’s Australian of the Year award recognised “his extraordinary 27-year contribution to the improvement of the youth mental health sector [that] has transformed the lives of tens of thousands of young people the world over.” He is currently the Executive Director of Oxygen Youth Health (OYH), Australia’s largest youth mental health organisation, Professor of Youth Mental Health at the University of Melbourne, and a founding member of the National Youth Mental Health Foundation (headspace) board. Professor McGorry’s work has played an integral role in the development of safe, effective treatments and innovative research involving the needs of young people with emerging mental disorders.

The Lambie-Dew Oration is an annual event that has been held by the Sydney University Medical Society since 1958 in honour of Charles Lambie and Harold Dew, the first Bosch Chairs of Medicine and Surgery respectively. Recent past speakers include Dr Rowan Gilles, Professor Ian Frazer, Professor Chris O’Brien, Professor Peter Doherty and Professor Marie Bashir.

If you would like further information, please contact Stuart Napier. snap6003@uni.sydney.edu.au

Diabetes and Sustainable Development: A Global Crisis

Speaker:
Professor Jean-Claude Mbanya (President of the International Diabetes Federation)

The world is experiencing unprecedented national debt and an uncertain economic future. The diabetes epidemic is at crisis point and challenges current global health and development approaches and priorities.

With 80% of the current 285 million cases of diabetes in LMCs, increasingly affecting people aged 35 to 64 ‐ the productive years ‐ diabetes has become a significant determinant of personal poverty, and transgenerational hardship and loss of life chances.

There is an insidious relationship between diabetes and key development indicators such as poverty and malnutrition; gender inequity and maternal mortality; major infections such as TB; and climate change. The impact of forgone income resulting from lost productivity due to diabetes is of concern to both developing and developed countries. In LMCs it undermines progress towards achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and contributes to state fragility.

This lecture will provide insights into these issues and discuss possible solutions for consideration by the 2011 UN Summit on Non‐Communicable Diseases.

When 5.30pm-7.00pm, Thursday, 2 September 2010
Where Lecture Theatre 101, New Law School
Cost FREE

About the Speaker

Jean Claude Mbanya is Professor of Medicine and Endocrinology at the Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaounde I, Cameroon and Consultant Physician, Director of the National Obesity Centre University of Yaounde and Chief of the Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases Unit at the Hospital Central in Yaounde.

His primary research interests are in the distribution, determinants and consequences of diabetes and related chronic diseases including cultural diabetes‐related factors, which are often unique to the African countries and communities he studies. His practice and research have largely contributed to increase the world’s awareness on diabetes in Africa, a continent where the devastating personal and macroeconomic economic impact of non‐contagious diseases like diabetes are too often overlooked.

Professor Mbanya was instrumental in the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) led ‘Unite for Diabetes’ campaign which resulted in the UN Resolution on Diabetes in December 2006. As President of IDF, he steers IDF strategic direction to encourage governments to implement policies for the treatment, care and prevention of diabetes and is currently leading the development of a global diabetes plan in preparation for the 2011 UN Summit on Non‐ Communicable Diseases.

Treating an Epidemic: HIV/AIDS

Speakers/Panel:
Bernard Gardiner (Red Cross Global HIV Program)
Dr Jonathan Anderson (ViiV Healthcare Australia, a joint venture by GlaxoSmithKline and Pfizer)
Bridget Haire (journalist, editor, policy analyst and advocate for HIV/AID prevention)

How do we begin combating the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and what progress has been made so far? This panel discussion explores the current issues facing the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDs as well as the progress being made every day in eradicating the disease.

When 12:00pm-1:00pm, Monday, 23 August 2010
Where Pharmacy Lecture Theatre
Cost FREE
RSVP Please email aphq@goldenkey.org

About the Speakers

Bernard Gardiner was a volunteer in the early HIV response in Australia and served two term as Vice President of the Victorian AIDS Council, and then was later its General Manager for three years. He managed the HIV Unit of the Victorian Human Services Department and chaired the 1st national conference of the Chronic Illness Alliance. His overseas work has been within the Red Cross Movement, first as Manager of the Australian Red Cross HIV Programme in East and South-East Asia for five years based in Bangkok, and then 7 years based in Geneva as Manager of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies Global HIV Programme. He has visited more than 50 countries to assist with HIV programming, and during his tenure the Red Cross HIV work expanded from $3 million per year to over $100 million per year.

Dr Jonathan Anderson is the Medical Director of ViiV Healthcare Australia, a joint venture by GlaxoSmithKlein and Pfizer that is 100% focused on treatment and care of HIV. He was a primary care doctor with a special interest in HIV, sexual health and gay men’s health at the Carlton & Northside clinics in Melbourne from 1993-2010. As an active member of the National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research network, he was involved in multiple clinical research studies and helped found the Australian HIV Observational Database. He was President of the Australasian Society for HIV Medicine and member of the Federal and state ministerial advisory committees. In 2004 he worked in Botswana for the African Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Development Partnership (ACHAP) a collaboration between the government of Botswana and the Gates Foundation. Currently, Jonathan is an Adjunct Associate Professor at Sydney Medical School and is the author of 26 peer-reviewed publications on HIV treatment and care, health economics, HPV and pandemic influenza.

Bridget Haire has worked in the HIV community sector for more than 15 years as a journalist, editor, policy analyst and advocate. She sits on the steering committee of the International Rectal Microbicides Advocates and is a graduate of the University of Sydney’s Masters of Bioethics program. Bridget works as Senior Policy Analyst for Family Planning NSW and is completing a PhD in Bioethics at the Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, University of Sydney.

Biological Agents in War and Terror

Speaker:
Professor Andreas Suhrbier (Immunovirology Group, Queensland Institute of Medical Research)

Join Sydney Nursing School for a lunchtime lecture with Professor Andreas Suhrbier, Head of Immunovirology Group, Queensland Institute of Medical Research on Biological Agents in War and Terror.

When 1:00pm-2:00pm, Monday, 16 August 2010
Where Sydney Nursing School, 88 Mallett Street, Camperdown
Cost FREE

End of Evidence Based Medicine

Speaker:
Professor Victor Montori (The Mayo Clinic)

The past 20 years saw an evolution in the idea of evidence based medicine (EBM) founded on two principles: one is most confident about a decision based on high-quality evidence, and evidence from clinical care research alone is insufficient to make a sound decision requiring the incorporation of patient context and preferences.

In this same period there is evolving realisation of the multitude of ways in which the evidence can be corrupted by poor methods, misleading design and dissemination of results, and fraud. As a result, this paradigm of practice is in crisis. This talk will substantiate these points and offer some ideas on a way out.

When 1:00pm-2:00pm, Tuesday, 25 May 2010
Where Conference Rooms, Darlington Centre
Cost FREE
RSVP Please email sphseminars@health.usyd.edu.au

Careers in Biomedical Sciences

Speakers:
Representatives from the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Are you interested in a careers in medicine, health sciences or biomedical research?

Guest speakers from the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute will conduct a session on careers in biomedical sciences. Starting with their own career story, the presenters will build up a picture of the various study pathways toward a career in biomedical sciences and the range of career options within the field.

When 1:00pm-2:00pm, Wednesday, 19 May
Where Woolley Lecture Theatre N395
Cost FREE
RSVP Please click here

On the Origin of Epidemics

Speaker:
Professor Edward Holmes

How do epidemics start and spread in human populations? Can we predict what epidemics will occur next?

These fundamental questions will be addressed by examining how evolving RNA viruses are able to jump species boundaries and emerge in humans, sometimes with devastating effects. As case studies of the origins and spread of influenza and dengue, both of which are of great public health importance in Australia, will be considered in detail.

More information

When 5:45-6:45pm, Thursday, 18 March 2010
Where Eastern Avenue Auditorium
Cost FREE
RSVP Please click here